Archive for the ‘Politics’ Category

2Norwalk housing project gets millions from taxpayers while Boston-based developer gives to Dems

Connecticut’s oldest public-housing project, Washington Village in Norwalk, has received tens of millions in taxpayer money recently, including $30 million in federal funding this week, while a top leader of the developer in charge of the $110 million project has been contributing regularly to the Connecticut Democratic Party.

Sens. Richard Blumenthal and Chris Murphy along with Rep. Jim Himes, who represents Norwalk, celebrated the grant from the Department of Housing and Urban Development Monday.

The funding is part of HUD’s Choice Neighborhoods Initiative, which hopes to convert affordable housing into mixed-income housing.

On Tuesday, Gov. Dannel Malloy and state Housing Commissioner Evonne Klein announced $9.8 million in additional federal funding passed through Connecticut’s new Department of Housing. HUD awarded Connecticut a total of $31 million for disaster recovery from Superstorm Sandy.

Previously, Washington Village received a $1.89 million low-income housing tax credit.

Boston-based Trinity Financial will redevelop Washington Village with the Norwalk Housing Authority and the Norwalk Redevelopment Agency.

Patrick Lee, a co-founder and executive vice president of the company, donated $7,500 to the Connecticut Democratic Party in the past year.

In 2013, Lee donated $2,500 on July 18 and again on Aug. 1.

HUD announced the availability of Choice Neighborhoods funding on June 13, 2013, and the deadline for applications was Aug. 12.

Malloy first announced the $9.8 million in disaster funding on April 11.

Lee donated another $2,500 on April 23. He made all of his donations to the party’s federal account. As a top executive at a company that receives state assistance, Lee would be ineligible to give to the party’s state account.

In November 2013, the party received thousands in donations from others with affordable-housing business, also through its federal account.

1Will government unions spend millions on Connecticut politics again?

Connecticut’s public employee unions are big players in the state’s elections, spending millions on their political operations, which may affect 2014 races.

The unions are a highly-focused, highly-motivated interest group when it comes to state-level elections, because the candidates who win will sit directly across the table from them during contract negotiations.

It can be a difficult task to “follow the money” when it comes to unions and campaign spending, but by searching the state’s online database of campaign contributions expenditures, a clearer picture of how much public sector unions are spending on state-level campaigns emerges.

In the two years between the 2010 and 2012 state elections, the largest public sector unions – including the Service Employees International Union (SEIU); American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME); American Federation of Teachers (AFT); and the Connecticut Education Association (CEA) – spent $834,968.51, on campaigns for state and local offices, the vast majority of it going to candidates or committees from the Democratic and Working Family parties.

The two years between the 2010 and 2012 state elections were tumultuous for state employees – it was during this time that they were in heated negotiations with Gov. Dan Malloy over a new contract.

Contributions to PACs and to candidates made up most of the $800,000-plus in spending, which was given primarily to elect state representatives and state senators since there were no statewide races in 2012.

Federal law requires unions to file disclosures on their political spending. The Department of Labor makes those disclosures available through an online database – unionreports.gov.

According to the disclosures filed with the Department of Labor, Connecticut’s public sector unions SEIU, AFT and AFSCME (none were found for the CEA) spent $4,286,949.85 on political activities in the years 2011-2013.

Anything unions do to support candidates for federal or state office is included in that amount – including political contributions or political activities like getting voters to the polls on election day.

0Longtime Democratic donor sees value of contracts increase during Malloy administration

Simon and Steven Konover, longtime Democratic donors including max-out contributions made last month, have seen rapid growth in their business with the state during the administration of Gov. Dannel Malloy.

The state paid Konover Commercial Corporation $1.5 million in 2010 and $1.7 million in 2011, according to the General Assembly’s transparency website. Malloy took office midway through fiscal year 2011. In 2012, the state paid the company $2.8 million and in 2013, $5.4 million.

4NBC Sports gets more taxpayer money after exec appears in state ads

NBC Sports is set to receive another $6 million in taxpayer funds – beyond the $20 million the company already received – in return for creating 150 new full-time jobs within five years.

The State Bond Commission will consider the funding proposal from the Department of Economic and Community Development Friday. The $6 million loan is forgivable, with payments deferred for five years and a 1 percent interest rate.

The subsidy amounts to $40,000 per job created. The first $20 million loan supported the creation of 450 jobs.

Earlier this month, an NBC Sports executive appeared in a state-funded economic development ad.

“We consolidated our operations right here,” Princell Hair, senior vice president of NBC Sports Group, says in the commercial.

“For the last several years, we have worked to create a business climate in this state that grows jobs,” Gov. Dannel Malloy said when he announced the ad campaign. “And everywhere from small businesses on Main Street to major companies, we are seeing results. This new phase of our effort to encourage economic growth makes it clear that Connecticut can be a destination for and home to innovative companies.”

Danbury Mayor Mark Boughton, a Republican candidate for governor, criticized the ads as “purely political.”

Employees of NBC Universal and NBC Sports contributed $4,600 to the Connecticut Democratic Party’s federal account in January. State contractors and recipients of state aid can donate to political parties through their federal accounts, despite the ban on direct contributions to candidates.

The owner of the property occupied by NBC Sports gave the party $2,500 in November.

0Two medical marijuana providers dispense cash to Democrats

Last month, state officials announced the six companies selected to dispense medical marijuana across the state and already two companies have made donations to the Connecticut Democratic Party’s federal account.

Federal accounts allows state contractors and regulated businesses to contribute to state parties without violating the ban on their donations.

Angelo DeFazio, a pharmacist and entrepreneur, gave $9,750 at the end of April, topping off a previous donation of $250 to reach the annual maximum. A company of his, Hartford-based Arrow Alternative Care, received one of the six dispensary licenses.

Massachusetts resident John Glowik Jr., owner of the South Windsor licensee, Prime Wellness of Connecticut, gave $2,500, as did John Glowik III.

A Glowik company in Massachusetts had applied for a license there, but did not receive a provisional one.

0Two companies in job-creator ads gave to Dems

Two of the companies highlighted in state job-creator advertisements recently contributed to the Connecticut Democratic Party’s federal account, one using its political action committee and another through top-level employees.

The ads feature leaders of Jackson Laboratory, Microboard Processing, NBC Sports Group, Datto, CIGNA and Evay Cosmetics. All of the companies received some form of state assistance.

CIGNA’s PAC gave $5,000 to the party in January.

Three NBC Sports and six NBC Universal executives gave a total of $4,600, also in January.

One of the two ads features Princell Hair, senior vice president of NBC Sports Group. Two fellow senior vice presidents, Robert Landau and Gregory Hughes, donated $500 each. NBC Sports Chairman Mark Lazarus donated $1,000.

The owner of the property occupied by NBC Sports gave the party $2,500 in November.

Although both CIGNA and NBC Sports are First Five companies receiving state support, they can legally give to the Democratic Party’s federal account.

William Cabral, an executive at Microboard Procession who didn’t appear in an ad, is a regular contributor to the Connecticut Republican Party’s federal account.

0Carla’s Pasta founder gets return on political donations

Carla Squatrito, founder of Carla’s Pasta in South Windsor, gave $1,000 to the Connecticut Democratic Party last month, following up on another $1,000 donation in November.

Squatrito is a regular contributor to Democratic candidates and political action committees, giving $48,150 since 1999, according to the Federal Elections Commission. She made state-level contributions as recently as 2011, but as a recipient of state funds can no longer do so. Her recent donations to the state party went to its federal account.

The federal account allows state contractors and recipients of state funds to avoid the ban on their political donations.

Last year, the Department of Economic and Community Development awarded Carla’s Pasta a $4 million forgivable loan to fund an expansion project.

In 2012, Carla’s Pasta received a $2.2 million loan and $750,000 grant from the state to install a fuel cell.

“In Connecticut, the government works,” company vice president Sergio Squatrito told CT News Junkie when Gov. Dannel Malloy visited the new fuel cell. “Too many times businesses don’t step up and say ‘without the government this would not be happening.’”

1Gilbane grows state business, execs give back to Dems

Executives with the construction firm and state contractor Gilbane Building Co. donated $3,750 to the Connecticut Democratic Party’s federal account last month.

A party’s federal account can accept donations from any U.S. citizen including banned state contractors, making the state-level prohibition on their contributions moot.

Providence-based Gilbane has seen a growing amount of state business in recent years. According to the legislature’s transparency website, the state paid Gilbane about $900,000 in 2010, $1.5 million in 2011, $12.5 million in 2012 and $37.4 million in 2013.

The company is also part of the Stamford Manhattan Development Ventures. DOT selected the SMDV joint venture as preferred developer last year on a redevelopment project expected to cost half a billion dollars.

Although DOT selected SMDV, the agency has not announced a contract with the joint venture. The SMDV partners are JHM Group, Ciminelli Real Estate Corporation, ECCO III Enterprises and Gilbane.

Employees of the SMDV partners have been generously donating to the Democratic Party’s federal account.

 Weeks after DOT selected SMDV, John McClutchy Jr. of the JHM Group gave a $10,000 contribution to the state party. His wife and son each gave $10,000 as well.

– In November, employees of Buffalo-based joint-venture members gave another $27,500.

– In December, employees of SMDV partners contributed $32,500.

The contributions of Gilbane employees bring the running total to $93,750 since the announcement of preferred developer status.

Gilbane is also working on the $135 million Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine in Farmington paid for with a forgivable state loan.

The state’s list of banned contractors does not include SMDV even though its principals are banned from making state-level political contributions.

0Access Health CT CEO Recognized for Valiant Efforts

Last Saturday a group of local college students known as the Wesleyan Young Advocates teamed up with the Middletown Community Health Center to honor the CEO of Access Health CT, the state’s Affordable Care Act portal, Kevin Counihan.

Flyers distributed by the studenaca bruncht group (pictured left) espoused Counihan and his underlings at Access Health CT for their “valiant contributions toward CT enrollment.”

Apparently the standard for what would constitute a valorous act has been lowered or is at least being misinterpreted by the WYA, who since September has been working to get Middletonians enrolled in the state healthcare exchange. I mean c’mon, does enrolling people in crummy government experiment that only 40% of people agree with really constitute an act of valor?

What surely was left unmentioned at this Left Wing love fest was the valor and courage it took to spend $79,000 on three pieces of artwork. Last December Raising Hale reported that Access Health CT, who is entrusted with the responsible management of private information on every enrollee, very responsibly used taxpayer dollars to have artwork commissioned and installed at various offices. Don’t worry though; Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman assures us that this is “a creative way for us to express that commitment to building healthier communities.”

Connecticut officials have boasted about the successes they have achieved enrolling people into the government controlled insurance marketplace in comparison with other state run exchanges. The Access Health CT exchange was also one of the first to reach completion, which of course is no surprise coming from a state that conceits to the President’s every wish.  

Meanwhile this week as millions instantly qualified for the Obamacare IRS penalty (supposedly), the President self-proclaimed the debate on repealing the healthcare law to be officially over. The achievement of the deadline enrollment goal of 7 million people apparently gives the president and the Left veto power over any argument concerning the successes or failures of Obamacare.

However what has not been reported by the administration is the amount of people that have actually paid for any of these healthcare purchases, the amount people who actually received healthcare for the first time or the amount of people that were forced off their existing coverage. Not to mention whether or not a sufficient amount of young “invincibles,” who are expected to shoulder the burden of healthcare costs, have enrolled to offset enrollees who will be totally subsidized.  

I guess when expectations for success are lowered to whether or not a multi-million dollar website actually functions one can easily be impressed.

Andrew is a Political Science Major at CCSU and a veteran of the USMC. 

0Candidate treasurer pleads guilty to stealing from state-funded campaign

The 2010 campaign manager and treasurer for Rep. Douglas McCrory, D-Hartford, pleaded guilty Wednesday to second-degree larceny for stealing $3,854.07 from the campaign.

Tanzania Cooper, 43, of Bloomfield, pleaded guilty to a reduced charge under the Alford doctrine. Previously, she faced first- and sixth-degree larceny charges.

Judge Jason Lobo sentenced Cooper to two years of probation, two years of suspended jail time and to pay restitution.

Prosecutor Christopher Alexy from the Chief State’s Attorney’s Office said Cooper “appropriated for herself campaign funds provided by the state.”

McCrory’s campaign paid Cooper $6,600 as manager.

An Alford plea means the defendant disputes some of the facts alleged by the prosecution, but admits the state likely has enough evidence to convict.

According to the arrest warrant affidavit, Cooper said McCrory “had no knowledge” and “was not involved.”

“Cooper never denied using campaign funds for personal and other unauthorized reasons,” the affidavit said. “She disputed the amount.”

According to the affidavit, Cooper said the amount was “closer to $2,000.”

“Cooper also indicated that other campaign members were involved with the illegal use of campaign funds but would not provide any further details saying, ‘Everyone has families,’ ‘It’s already a mess, it’s embarrassing,’ and ‘It’s going to be a circus,’” the affidavit said.

The State Elections Enforcement Commission referred evidence Cooper embezzled about $4,600 to the Office of the Chief State’s Attorney in August, prompting an investigation.

According to the affidavit, about 23 debit card withdrawals appear on the campaign’s bank statements but not on its expense reports.

McCrory participated in the Citizens’ Election Program, which provides state grants to campaigns. On July 26, 2010, his campaign received $25,980 in public funds.

Three of Cooper’s alleged cash withdrawals occurred before that date, leading to the charge of sixth-degree larceny. According to the affidavit, at least 19 unauthorized debits diverted funds from the state grant, leading to the felony first-degree charge.

According to the affidavit, Shawn Council was the first treasurer for the McCrory campaign and Cooper took over that role after she left.

Inspector Matthew Schroeder, who conducted the investigation and wrote the affidavit, also found evidence of expenditures that were never received by the recipient reported by the campaign.

Aziel Brown, the campaign’s deputy treasurer, told Schroeder “he never attended any meetings or performed any tasks for the McCrory campaign in any capacity.”

Cooper admitted to falsely claiming to have paid Brown $450, which he never received, to cover up her withdrawals, according to the affidavit.