Features

MDC liens property owned by Mayor Segarra’s husband for unpaid water bills

The Metropolitan District Commission has placed a lien for more than $2,000 in unpaid water bills on condos owned by Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra’s husband, Charlie Ortiz.

Ortiz owns a number of properties in the city, including five of the units at 57 John St. where the MDC placed the $2,418 lien.

A spokeswoman for the mayor did not respond to requests for comment.

According to an attorney for the MDC, the lien is on all six units but each unit owes one-sixth the amount. The MDC will release the liens on each unit if its owner pays a proportionate share of the unpaid fees, plus a $26 release fee.

Rising MDC bills has become an issue for some South End residents, says Hyacinth Yennie, chairwoman of the Maple Avenue Revitalization Group.

Yennie said MDC bills have gone up, in some cases more than double, and they “are going out in a threatening way.”

She said one woman with a $900 bill told the MDC she couldn’t pay it all at once. “She was told, ‘No, you better send it all.’”

Carmen Duhaney, a South End resident, said her MDC bill went up from $210 per quarter to more than $400 per quarter. “It’s not affordable,” she said.

“Customer service was very nasty to her,” Yennie said. “They’re like pitbulls.”

Yennie said it’s also important to have oversight of the MDC. “There is no accountability when it comes to spending our money,” she said, explaining voters approved an $800 million MDC project in 2012. “We knew we were going to have to pay, but we didn’t know at what cost.”

“The plan is to have a meeting with the mayor,” Yennie said. “He’s so into this stupid stadium, I’m not sure I can get a word in.”

Out-of-state developer, donor gets another $1.3 million; total support $43 million

A Norwalk affordable-housing project received another $1.3 million in state support, bringing total government support to more than $43 million for a project with an out-of-state developer.

Boston-based Trinity Financial is leading the $110 million Washington Village redevelopment.

Patrick Lee, a co-founder and executive vice president of the company, gave $7,500 to the Connecticut Democratic Party’s federal account since 2013. State law would prohibit Lee, as a beneficiary of state funding, from making donations to candidates for state office or to the state party’s account to benefit those candidates. However, recipients of state funding and state contractors can give to the same party’s federal account.

The latest batch of funding is $1.3 million for brownfield remediation. Previously, the project received:

  • $30 million from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Choice Neighborhoods Initiative, which hopes to convert affordable housing into mixed-income housing.
  • $9.8 million from the state Department of Housing, passing through federal money intended for the Superstorm Sandy recovery.
  • $1.89 million as a low-income housing tax credit.

In November 2013, the party received thousands in donations from others with affordable-housing business, also through its federal account.

Teachers’ union official with state appointment describes herself online as a proud “union thug”

AFT Union Thug highlightA Connecticut teachers’ union official who holds an appointed position in state government calls herself a “union thug and proud of it” on her Twitter page.

Jean Morningstar is second vice president of the American Federation of Teachers Connecticut. Gov. Dannel Malloy appointed her to serve on the State Contracting Standards Board last year.

A recent tweet included a picture of Morningstar posing with Malloy.

After a fight over education reform including proposed changes to teacher tenure, Malloy and AFT have grown close again.

Malloy and AFT national President Randi Weingarten are expected Friday to tour schools together in Meriden and New Haven.

Last month, Malloy appointed Erin Benham, one of 22 AFT Connecticut vice presidents, to the State Board of Education.

In 2012, Malloy appointed Sharon Palmer, then president of AFT Connecticut, to serve as labor commissioner.

Audit: Bridgeport Housing Authority rents too affordable, undercharged tenants millions since 2004

Federal auditors found the Bridgeport Housing Authority improperly set rental rates for more than 150 tenants, causing the authority to forego millions in revenue that it could have reinvested in its properties.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Inspector General, following up on a previous report that faulted the authority for offering employees “Cadillac” health insurance, said the authority, also known as Park City Communities, has not updated its flat rent since 2004.

Since the cost of housing has risen since 2004, the authority should have updated its flat rents, according to the report released last month.

Auditors said they couldn’t precisely estimate how much revenue the authority lost, but said it was at least “millions.”

In the most recent year, the authority missed out on about $600,000 because it undercharged 161 tenants an average of $300 per month.

According to the audit, new staff at the authority are implementing its recommendations, including updated flat rents.

The report also raised two issues related to unreported conflicts of interest.

Authority officials failed to disclose an apparent conflict of interest when they contracted with a director’s family member to perform work for the authority’s federal programs. After discussing the issue, the executive director took corrective action and terminated the contract.

The authority also had a longstanding contract with an individual who later became an elected official and thus had a HUD-defined conflict of interest. However, officials did not inform HUD or obtain the required approval. After discussing the issue, authority officials agreed to request the waiver, and HUD officials indicated that they were inclined to approve a waiver for this individual to run an after-school program.

Malloy hosted 200 last year for St. Patrick’s Day bash

A peek inside the Governor’s Residence shows how Dannel Malloy has dealt with the joys and sorrows of being Connecticut’s chief executive.

Some parties were catered, others canceled.

On the joyous side, Malloy hosted a St. Patrick’s Day party for 200 people in 2013, according to documents obtained from the state agency that manages the Governor’s Residence.

After the Newtown school shootings Malloy canceled five holiday receptions.

Among the canceled events was a Dec. 20, 2012, press reception for 100 expected to cost $3,450, according to the documents from the Department of Administrative Services, emails spanning December 2012 to April 2013.

The administration rescheduled some of the canceled events for early 2013, but the documents don’t provide a clear picture of how the rescheduled events match up with the canceled ones.

According to the documents, taxpayers paid for six catered events totaling about $15,000 at the residence during the five-month period with most of that going toward the $6,900 St. Patrick’s Day party.

The March 16 St. Patrick’s Day party cost $30 per person, plus a 15 percent service charge.

On Jan. 10, 2013, Malloy had a “formal sit-down dinner” for eight catered by Russell’s Creative Global Cuisine. The menu included a romaine, fennel and blood orange salad with pomegranate vinaigrette; braised beef short ribs with green peppercorn demi-glace; and warm apple crisp. The dinner, including four extra orders of short ribs, cost $654.47.

Malloy hosted local elected officials for a breakfast on Feb. 6. Mary’s Catering charged $265.50 for 25 people. Another event for local officials on Feb. 26, also handled by Mary’s Catering, cost $1,239 for 75 people.

A Feb. 7 luncheon for commissioners catered by Russell’s Creative Global Cuisine cost $3,584.72.

Culinary Accents catered a cocktail party for “inner-city clergy” on Feb. 15 for $2,625.

Two outgoing members of Malloy’s staff, Roy Occhiogrosso and Andrew McDonald, paid for catered events at the residence. Occhiogrosso, who left the Governor’s Office at the end of 2012 to return to the communications firm Global Strategy Group, paid for a Jan. 11 event at the residence. McDondald, Malloy’s general counsel until he became a justice on the Connecticut Supreme Court in January 2013, paid for an event on Feb. 20.

Did Occhiogrosso and McDonald pay for their own farewell parties? The Governor’s Office declined to provide any context about the events, but it appears they may have.

The residence also frequently hosts charitable events. At one April event, according to the emails, a catering worker helped himself to some of Malloy’s personal ice cream and wine.