Archive for the ‘Topics’ Category

1Republicans: Gruber paid at least $120,000 for Connecticut work

House Republicans say a controversial healthcare economist behind Obamacare received at least $120,000 for his work in Connecticut.

Jonathan Gruber of MIT has been in the spotlight for recently publicized video footage of him criticizing American voters for being stupid. Additional footage has Gruber saying former U.S. Sen. Ted Kennedy “ripped off” Medicaid.

Gruber did work for the $1 billion plus Sustinet plan in Connecticut. Sustinet never advanced beyond a board to study the idea because state employees turned on the idea.

The Sustinet board was able to avoid transparency requirements because two outside groups, the Universal Health Care Foundation of Connecticut and the Connecticut Health Foundation, paid its expenses.

House Republicans said they have identified $120,000 in payments from the Universal Health Care Foundation to Gruber around the time of the Sustinet work.

“Jonathan Gruber made millions consulting on healthcare issues from Obamacare and from states, including Connecticut,’’ said incoming House Minority Leader Themis Klarides. “The man who famously said a lack of transparency on these issues was a political asset in passing Obamacare has benefited enormously from a lack of transparency when it comes to his personal income.’’

Klarides called for more disclosure regarding Gruber’s work in Connecticut.

2Healthcare economist who believes in the ‘stupidity of the American voter’ advised Conn. in 2010

Remember Sustinet, Connecticut’s $1 billion-plus plan to combine Medicaid, state employee health plans and a government-run health insurer?

In 2010, MIT health economist Jonathan Gruber performed modeling for the Sustinet plan. Gruber, considered an architect of Obamacare, is in the news because of recently-uncovered video of him calling out the “stupidity of the American voter.”

The video shows Gruber explaining why the Obamacare legislation couldn’t say what it actually did, because then it wouldn’t pass.

Gov. Dannel Malloy’s transition team report on healthcare from four years ago includes a presentation on Sustinet with the results of Gruber’s work.

Sustinet failed when many state employees questioned the concept of combining their health plan with Medicaid and asked whether the union leaders pushing the plan were looking out for the best interest of the rank and file.

Gruber earned nearly $400,000 from the federal government and significant sums from other states, although the amount paid by Connecticut is not public. The Sustinet board used nonprofits to pay for its research which allowed it to skirt transparency rules.

0Complaint targets state rep’s PAC for inadequate disclosure

A complaint alleges that a political action committee run by a Democratic state representative failed to disclose its activity properly, including last-minute contributions to town party committees right before the 2013 municipal election.

After Donna Hemmann, a Republican member of the Wethersfield Town Council, filed the complaint with the State Elections Enforcement Commission in May, the PAC filed amended reports to disclose two $500 donations to the Wethersfield Democratic Town Committee made on Oct. 21 and Nov. 5, 2013.

Rep. Russ Morin, D-Wethersfield, controls the Pro-Progressive Energetic Leaders PAC, also known as Pro-PEL. Morin did not respond to requests for comment for this article. Outside of the legislature, Morin works for Connecticut Employees Union Independent, one of the state employee unions and an SEIU local. His PAC draws considerable support from unions.

The Wethersfield DTC did properly report the contributions, which is how Hemmann learned about them.

Pro-PEL’s amended report also disclosed other October donations that weren’t previously reported, including $500 for the Berlin Democratic Town Committee.

Hemmann also questioned how the committee raised $3,455 at a fundraiser that cost only $25, saying the “return on investment defies credibility.”

SEEC scheduled the complaint, 2014-058, for discussion during executive session on Oct. 14.

2Soros maxes out to Connecticut Democrats while banned contractors continue to give

The Connecticut Democratic Party raised nearly $350,000 in individual contributions to its federal account last month, including thousands from state contractors.

The party reported its latest haul to the Federal Elections Commission a week ago. Although state contractors and recipients of state aid are banned from donating to candidates or political parties, they can legally give to a party’s federal account. Democrats drew attention to the practice recently by using the federal account money to support the reelection of Gov. Dannel Malloy, prompting Republicans to sue.

Donors associated with the state contractor HAKS Engineers gave another $20,000 to the Connecticut Democrats last month, bringing their total contributions since last year to $70,000.

Other notable donors include:

Update: John T. Moore, CEO of the Marwood Group, gave $10,000 to the Democratic Party’s federal account last month. His colleague at Marwood, Ted Kennedy Jr., is running for state senate in Branford. Kennedy’s Republican opponent, Bruce Wilson Jr., recently filed a complaint accusing him of using the state party to make contributions over the legal limit.

1Democratic Party uses state contractor money to support Malloy

The Connecticut Democratic Party asked federal regulators earlier this month for permission to use a stockpile of cash from state contractors to support the reelection of Gov. Dannel Malloy, but rather than wait for a response the party began mailing advertisements using the money.

Since at least 2013, the state Democratic Party has used its federal account to collect donations from state contractors who are banned from giving directly to candidates or the party’s state account. The Federal Elections Commission has not ruled on the party’s request to use the money to influence a state election.

In many states, federal rules are stricter than state rules making it unlikely parties would use federal money for state candidates. However, in Connecticut the federal rules are more permissive in the sense that they don’t prevent state contractors from making contributions.

The ban includes owners and top decision makers at companies that have state contracts or receive state aid.

The most prominent example of this conundrum was Northeast Utilities CEO Thomas May, who solicited donations from his employees to support Malloy’s reelection through the federal account. At the time, it was thought the federal account could not directly help Malloy, but with the latest request to the FEC the link became clearer.

State law does allow parties to indirectly transfer federal account money to the state account by routing it through a national party committee.

The Democratic Party, through its federal account, has raised money from numerous state contractors and recipients of state aid, contributors who can’t give to the same party’s state account. The ban was put in place after Republican ex-Gov. John Rowland resigned and pleaded guilty to a federal corruption charge.

A number of employees at Northeast Utilities donated a year ago after the company’s CEO sent his controversial email. Employees of DOT contractor HAKS Engineers gave the party $45,000 last year and another $10,000 this year. Some of those donations may have been solicited at an event attended by Malloy. Leaders of a joint venture selected by DOT for a $500 million project in Stamford last year gave the party nearly $100,000 in donations since the agency made its decision – and while it negotiated a final agreement.

At least two medical marijuana dispensaries gave to the Democratic Party’s federal account. The Board of Regents chairman appointed by Malloy gave the maximum gift of $10,000 right before his appointment and again this year – as did his wife. One former donor to the Republican Party cynically redirected his support to the Democratic Party’s federal account after Malloy’s election; one of his companies went on to receive $6 million in borrowed state money.

The party also raised money from affordable housing developers, First Five companies, Mystic Aquarium and other recipients of state aid.

0Brookfield Board of Education confirms termination of superintendent

The Brookfield Board of Education unanimously voted Thursday to terminate Superintendent Anthony Bivona, confirming a decision the board originally made in May.

The same board that fired Bivona earlier this year sat in judgment of him during a multi-part hearing that stretched on for months.

The board fired Bivona, who led the district for seven years, after auditors discovered the district had been using a gimmick to balance its budget. Bivona’s longtime business manager, Art Colley, resigned under scrutiny earlier this year.

The audit found that $1.3 million in school district bills had been pushed into the subsequent fiscal year. The town approved a supplemental appropriation of more than $1.1 million to bring the school district’s budget back into balance.

Bivona claimed throughout the hearing process he didn’t know what Colley was doing. The board’s attorney claimed Bivona should have known and the board agreed with his conclusion. Bivona’s attorney argued political pressure led to the firing making it arbitrary and illegal.

0MDC liens property owned by Mayor Segarra’s husband for unpaid water bills

The Metropolitan District Commission has placed a lien for more than $2,000 in unpaid water bills on condos owned by Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra’s husband, Charlie Ortiz.

Ortiz owns a number of properties in the city, including five of the units at 57 John St. where the MDC placed the $2,418 lien.

A spokeswoman for the mayor did not respond to requests for comment.

According to an attorney for the MDC, the lien is on all six units but each unit owes one-sixth the amount. The MDC will release the liens on each unit if its owner pays a proportionate share of the unpaid fees, plus a $26 release fee.

Rising MDC bills has become an issue for some South End residents, says Hyacinth Yennie, chairwoman of the Maple Avenue Revitalization Group.

Yennie said MDC bills have gone up, in some cases more than double, and they “are going out in a threatening way.”

She said one woman with a $900 bill told the MDC she couldn’t pay it all at once. “She was told, ‘No, you better send it all.’”

Carmen Duhaney, a South End resident, said her MDC bill went up from $210 per quarter to more than $400 per quarter. “It’s not affordable,” she said.

“Customer service was very nasty to her,” Yennie said. “They’re like pitbulls.”

Yennie said it’s also important to have oversight of the MDC. “There is no accountability when it comes to spending our money,” she said, explaining voters approved an $800 million MDC project in 2012. “We knew we were going to have to pay, but we didn’t know at what cost.”

“The plan is to have a meeting with the mayor,” Yennie said. “He’s so into this stupid stadium, I’m not sure I can get a word in.”

4Teachers’ union official with state appointment describes herself online as a proud “union thug”

AFT Union Thug highlightA Connecticut teachers’ union official who holds an appointed position in state government calls herself a “union thug and proud of it” on her Twitter page.

Jean Morningstar is second vice president of the American Federation of Teachers Connecticut. Gov. Dannel Malloy appointed her to serve on the State Contracting Standards Board last year.

A recent tweet included a picture of Morningstar posing with Malloy.

After a fight over education reform including proposed changes to teacher tenure, Malloy and AFT have grown close again.

Malloy and AFT national President Randi Weingarten are expected Friday to tour schools together in Meriden and New Haven.

Last month, Malloy appointed Erin Benham, one of 22 AFT Connecticut vice presidents, to the State Board of Education.

In 2012, Malloy appointed Sharon Palmer, then president of AFT Connecticut, to serve as labor commissioner.

0Audit: Bridgeport Housing Authority rents too affordable, undercharged tenants millions since 2004

Federal auditors found the Bridgeport Housing Authority improperly set rental rates for more than 150 tenants, causing the authority to forego millions in revenue that it could have reinvested in its properties.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Inspector General, following up on a previous report that faulted the authority for offering employees “Cadillac” health insurance, said the authority, also known as Park City Communities, has not updated its flat rent since 2004.

Since the cost of housing has risen since 2004, the authority should have updated its flat rents, according to the report released last month.

Auditors said they couldn’t precisely estimate how much revenue the authority lost, but said it was at least “millions.”

In the most recent year, the authority missed out on about $600,000 because it undercharged 161 tenants an average of $300 per month.

According to the audit, new staff at the authority are implementing its recommendations, including updated flat rents.

The report also raised two issues related to unreported conflicts of interest.

Authority officials failed to disclose an apparent conflict of interest when they contracted with a director’s family member to perform work for the authority’s federal programs. After discussing the issue, the executive director took corrective action and terminated the contract.

The authority also had a longstanding contract with an individual who later became an elected official and thus had a HUD-defined conflict of interest. However, officials did not inform HUD or obtain the required approval. After discussing the issue, authority officials agreed to request the waiver, and HUD officials indicated that they were inclined to approve a waiver for this individual to run an after-school program.

1New Democratic Party landlord gets bond commission funding for another property

The new landlord for the Connecticut Democratic Party received bond commission funds last week to renovate a different property totaling $320,000.

The Capital Region Development Authority will lend the money to 360 Main Street Associates at 3 percent interest for 20 years with a balloon payment in year three.

According to the bond commission agenda, CRDA funding will “assist in conversion of underperforming commercial space into 20 units of housing, including 16 micro units.”

The Connecticut Democratic Party recently moved to 30 Arbor Street. The property owner, 30 Arbor Street LLC, is controlled by Carlos Mouta, according to the Secretary of the State’s online database.

Mouta also controls 360 Main Street Associates according to the same database.

On May 23, according to party filings with the Federal Elections Commission, the Democrats paid $1,420 to 30 Arbor Street LLC for rent.

On June 12, the party made two rent payments to the same entity: $2,334.75 and $994.